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Hidetakayama is a place which still retains the essence of old Japan, and it is also a popular tourist location. A major event in the area is the Takayama Festival.
Takayama Festival is the general term for the “Sannou Festival,” held in spring, and the “Hachiman Festival” held in autumn. The spring Takayama Festival (Sannou Festival) has been held annually at Hie Shrine since long ago. The Sannou Festival is a traditional festival, beloved by the people, that is held to announce the arrival of spring.

Gifu Prefecture – Spring Takayama Festival (Sannou Festival)

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Hidetakayama is a place which still retains the essence of old Japan, and it is also a popular tourist location. A major event in the area is the Takayama Festival.
Takayama Festival is the general term for the “Sannou Festival,” held in spring, and the “Hachiman Festival” held in autumn. The spring Takayama Festival (Sannou Festival) has been held annually at Hie Shrine since long ago. The Sannou Festival is a traditional festival, beloved by the people, that is held to announce the arrival of spring.

Every year on January 15th, people make a pilgrimage to three temples in Hida-Furukawa: Enko-ji, Shinshu-ji, and Honkou-ji.
The three temples feature large Japanese candles, and the main streets of town are lined with giant 2-meter-tall snow candles.
Many women go out wearing gorgeous kimono for this event.
At night, the “Thousand Candles” event is held along the Seto River. People come and light white candles to pray for love.
And, if their prayers come true, the following year they come back and light a red candle.
Tourists are also free to join in the event.

Gifu Prefecture, Hida-Furukawa - Three Temples Pilgrimage

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Every year on January 15th, people make a pilgrimage to three temples in Hida-Furukawa: Enko-ji, Shinshu-ji, and Honkou-ji.
The three temples feature large Japanese candles, and the main streets of town are lined with giant 2-meter-tall snow candles.
Many women go out wearing gorgeous kimono for this event.
At night, the “Thousand Candles” event is held along the Seto River. People come and light white candles to pray for love.
And, if their prayers come true, the following year they come back and light a red candle.
Tourists are also free to join in the event.

Shirakawa-go, a beautiful area where traditional Japanese scenery still exists, is home to the largest number of still-standing traditional “gassho-zukuri” Japanese homes. As of 2016, there are around 100 buildings still standing, both large and small. It is the largest remaining historic settlement in Japan, and it is preserved as a Group of Traditional Buildings in the register of Cultural Properties of Japan.
In 1995, Shirakawa-go was registered as a World Cultural Heritage Site, under the classification of “outstanding examples of traditional human settlements that are perfectly adapted to their environment and their social and economic raison d’être,” that “…preserves both the spiritual and the material evidence of [its] long history.”

Shirakawa-go (Historic Village)

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Shirakawa-go, a beautiful area where traditional Japanese scenery still exists, is home to the largest number of still-standing traditional “gassho-zukuri” Japanese homes. As of 2016, there are around 100 buildings still standing, both large and small. It is the largest remaining historic settlement in Japan, and it is preserved as a Group of Traditional Buildings in the register of Cultural Properties of Japan.
In 1995, Shirakawa-go was registered as a World Cultural Heritage Site, under the classification of “outstanding examples of traditional human settlements that are perfectly adapted to their environment and their social and economic raison d’être,” that “…preserves both the spiritual and the material evidence of [its] long history.”