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Kyushu Region × Sightseeing SpotsPage: 1/2

Tenmonkan Millionation 2018

Tenmonkan Millionation is a large-scale illumination of Tenmonkan, Kagoshima’s largest downtown area, utilizing around 1 million lights. Keeping in mind Tenmonkan’s namesake, the astronomical observation facility “Meijikan,” (also known as “Tenmonkan”) the theme for the illumination is “cosmic creation.”

Nagasaki Kunchi – A fall festival complete with an impressive dragon dance!

This exciting fall festival celebrated at Nagasaki City's Suwa Shrine is one you won't want to miss. With a history of over 370 years, it is the most famous festival in Nagasaki. At the Nagasaki Kunchi Festival you can watch dances which incorporate the influence of Portuguese, Dutch, and Chinese culture on the area. While watching the spectacular dragon dance, spectators encouragingly yell "Mottekoi!"which means "Encore!"

Fukuoka Prefecture – Hakata Gion Yamakasa

A Festival Registered as a UNESCO World Intangible Heritage in 2016.
Hakata Gion Yamakasa is a Shinto festival of Kushida Shrine in Fukuoka City’s Hakata-ku. The festival’s formal name is Kushida Jinja Gion Retsu Oomatsuri.
It is a powerful festival, where a large number of men carry wheel-less mikoshi shrines on their shoulders throughout Hakata-ku.
There are various theories on the festival’s origins, but supposedly it began in 1241 when holy water was sprinkled across town from atop a float to drive away an epidemic.
Various events take place every year from July 1st through the 15th. Here we will introduce some of the highlights, like “Oiyama,” “Oiyama Narashi,” and “Shudan Yamamise.”

Kirishima-Jingu

Kirishima-Jingu

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Kirishima-Jingu is a shrine that represents southern Kyushu. Founded in the 6th century, it boasts a deep and ancient history.
Kirishima-Jingu was transferred to its present location over 500 years ago, after repeatedly burning down and being rebuilt due to Mt. Kirishima’s eruptions.
This shrine worships Ninigi-no-Mikoto of Japan’s founding myth.

Sakurajima

Sakurajima

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Sakurajima is an active composite volcano located in Kagoshima Bay. It is a symbol of Kagoshima, and part of Kirishima-Yaku National Park. The volcano began to form around 26,000 years ago, and it has had 17 major eruptions. Sakurajima used to be an island, as its name suggests (shima means island), but the lava flow from the 1914 eruption filled the strait between Sakurajima and the mainland, connecting it to the Osumi Peninsula. Even in the present day, Sakurajima has small-scale eruptions nearly daily.
However, many people live on Sakurajima. It is said that volcanoes are a source of blessings, including delicious crops and hot springs that relieve people’s fatigue.
The smoke that Sakurajima spews is powerful and entrancing, making it a popular attraction.

Sun Messe Nichinan

Sun Messe Nichinan is home to seven reproductions of Easter Island Moai statues. It is the only place in the world that has been allowed to restore and display these statues.
Permission to restore the Moai statues was granted as a display of gratitude for equipment and financial aid by a Japanese crane company after a large earthquake and tribal conflicts ravaged Easter Island.

Daikanbo

Daikanbo

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Daikanbo is the highest peak of the Aso mountain chain. Daikanbo’s mountain overlook is the most popular of all the overlooks in the Aso mountain chain. Thanks in part to this amazing view, Daikanbo became part of Aso Kuju National Park when it was established in 1934.

Yoshinogari Historical Park

Yoshinogari Historical Park is a specially designated historical site of Japan.
Spanning a total area of 117 hectares, Yoshinogari Historical Park is Japan’s largest historic ruins from the Yayoi Era (3c. B.C. - 3c. A.D.).
The ruins were discovered during an excavation in 1986.