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Nature/Secluded SpotsPage: 1/9

Ice Fall Festival in Sounkyo, Hokkaido

The Ice Fall Festival is one of Hokkaido’s 3 largest snow festivals that started in 1976. This festival is hosted on the big river bank (about 10,000㎡) of the Ishikari river.
At the festival you will see a variety of interesting ice sculptures such as an ice look out, an ice castle, ice tunnels, and an ice slide.
There is also an assortment of fun planned events such as the Asahikawa local sake tasting and the throwing away of good luck Mochi(sticky rice cakes) from the stage.

Nara, Wakakusa Yamayaki

The Wakakusa Yamayaki is an event where the 342-meter-high Mt. Wakakusa that overlooks Nara City is lit on fire.
This is a Shinto ritual meant to calm the spirits inhabiting the keyhole-shaped tumulus on the mountain’s summit.
After around 600 fireworks are launched, 33 hectares of grasslands on the mountain are set aflame.
The dynamic scene that unfolds is almost like watching a forest fire. The winter night sky is dyed red, and the view of the entirety of the mountain lit up is magnificent.

Wakayama, Shionomisaki Lighthouse’s Grass Burning

The grass burning is a customary event of Shionomisaki Lighthouse, the southernmost place in Honshu, to eliminate pests and to encourage growth of new plantlife. The event is joined by local folk dances and taiko performances.
In the blink of an eye, flames spread across around 6 hectares of grass overlooking the Pacific Ocean, and it burns up in as little as one hour. Visitors can enjoy the flames up close. Fireworks are also launched, setting a fantastical atmosphere.
Visitors can also enjoy being treated to free food, like the local specialty “Shorasan Nabe,” a miso nabe dish filled with fish cakes, pork, and vegetables.

Miyagi Zao Juhyo “Ice Monster” Tours

This tour takes you to see the rare “juhyo,” as you ride in Wild Monster, a heated Snowcat bus.“Juhyo,” also known as “ice monsters,” are trees covered in ice and snow in the process of a phenomenon where mist and water vapors freeze directly onto deciduous trees. The formation of juhyo requires precise conditions, such as constant wind from a single direction, so they can only be seen in a few specific locations in Japan’s Tohoku region, including Zao.Zao is a popular tourist spot not just for its juhyo, but for skiing and hot springs as well.