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Japanese DictionaryPage: 1/2

What is Soba?

What is Soba?

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Soba is a type of noodle made of buckwheat. Like udon, it is served in both hot and cold soups, as well as in cup-noodles. Buckwheat is rich in vitamins and nutrients such as rutin and potassium. The water that soba noodles are cooked in, called “soba water,” also has high nutritional value, and many restaurants will serve it to you on the house.

What is Oshibori?

Also referred to as “otefuki,” or “hand wipes,” these towels are slightly larger than the size of your palm and are used to wipe your hands before a meal.

What is Ohiya?

What is Ohiya?

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Also referred to as “otefuki,” or “hand wipes,” these towels are slightly larger than the size of your palm and are used to wipe your hands before a meal.

What is Onigiri?

Sometimes also known as “omusubi,” onigiri are triangular rounded balls of rice. Most are wrapped in nori (seaweed) so that they are easier to hold. They are often used as a portable food that you don’t need chopsticks or tableware to eat.

What is  Udon?

What is Udon?

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Udon is a thick, long type of noodle made with wheat flower, water, and salt. It is delicious in both hot and cold soups.

What is Tonkatsu?

Tonkatsu is a dish where pork loin and fillets are breaded in flour, egg wash, and panko, fried, and then cut into slightly thick slices.

What is Hand-Rolled Sushi?

Hand-rolled sushi is a dish where vinegar-seasoned rice is spread across a hand-sized sheet of nori, topped with fillings such as sashimi and cucumber, and rolled into a cone.

What is Soy Sauce?

Soy sauce is a dark brown liquid seasoning integral to Japanese cooking. It is made by fermenting soy, wheat, and salt. Used to season both simmered and grilled dishes, or even applied directly to food like sushi and sashimi, soy sauce is used in a wide variety of ways!